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Airbrush Setup

Wanting to improve the quality of my builds, I finally bit the bullet and forked out for a complete airbrush setup. I read the excellent guide written by my mate John from The Painting Bunker, then we hooked up and spent a few hours driving around Brisbane together picking up all the bits and pieces.

John’s advice was to spend MORE on the compressor and LESS on the actual brush. That sounded a little counter-intuitive to me, but he made sense. According to John, and he – literally – is the expert, you should expect to trash your first airbrush due to a variety of reasons. So spending $100+ on a brush isn’t too smart. Instead, I bought a $60 job from Supercheap Auto.

There are effectively two functions of an airbrush that you need to make a decision about. One is how the paint feeds into the brush. There are Gravity Fed and Syphon Fed brushes, and they’re pretty self explanatory. The Gravity Fed brushes have a little “tub” attached to the top of the brush and when you press the trigger, the paint drops into the brush and out the nozzle.

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Posted by on March 21, 2013 in Tutorials

 

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1970 Buick GSX Pimp Mobile – Part 2

Yo, check it out Playa. Iz got some pimpin’ stripes on my ride fo shizzle.

Thanks to a post I saw on the modelcarsmag forum a while ago, I’ve been trying my hand at pinstriping. My first effort was on my ’82 Corvette Snap-kit and was pretty simple. I tried a few designs but failed every time I had the tape crossing over itself. So this time I wanted to push myself. You only get better by doing something new, right?

I searched the web for pinstripe designs and using what I saw, I came up with my own design – one for the hood and one for the trunk. LOTS of cross-overs in these designs, so I was nervous during the whole experience. The problem with pinstriping is that you can’t check it as you go. Once you remove that tape, the process ends, so you have to leave it there until the piece is completely painted and ready for polishing or clear coats. It’s a scary time.

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Posted by on March 5, 2013 in Cars, Monogram, Tamiya

 

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Scale Modelling Starter Kit

At the time of writing this post, I’m away for Christmas, so I’m suffering some major withdrawals. I can’t build anything, and I can’t take any photos to write a post about, and I can’t really do anything. It’s only been two weeks, but I’m going out of my mind!

So this morning my amazing wife came up with the idea of doing a post for those starting out (or RE-starting) their modelling hobby, by giving some advice on a “starter kit”. It can be a bit daunting, especially if you’ve been on any forums, like Model Cars Magazine Forum and you see what other people are doing with their kits. But what it all boils down to is getting the right tools for the right job.

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Posted by on December 30, 2012 in Cars, Tamiya, Tutorials, Uncategorized

 

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1970 Mustang Boss 429 – part 2

One thing I really wanted to do with this kit was to wire up the engine. I’d tried it once before, but the wire I used was far too thick. I’m pretty sure I used 22 AWG (aka 22 gauge) wire, when what you really need is 30 gauge. I found it once on the Jaycar website, but I ended up getting it from Wiltronics.

Not being an expert on cars or engines, I needed to do a lot of research before I started on this little project. So I looked at photos of a real engine from a 1970 Mustang, and I looked at modelcarmags forums to see what other modellers have done.

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Posted by on December 24, 2012 in Cars, Revell, Tutorials

 

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Scale Model Opening Doors

Wanting to take my models one step further, I researched how to make the doors open. I got the idea after building my 1958 Plymouth Belvedere a.k.a “Christine“, where I removed the trunk in order to hold a 9v battery. After scouring the internet, looking at tutorials and having a go at Doctor Cranky’s door hinges, I got too frustrated with the whole thing, so I designed my own. While not as sturdy as Doctor Cranky’s, they are easier to build and easier to install.

Before you begin this project, you need to commit to it. Removing the door pieces is one thing, but once the doors are off and the hinges are made, you will need to actually build yourself a door. This means getting some thin styrene to scratch build the “body” of the door. For the hinge, I can teach you how to put it all together, but building the door is a seat-of-the-pants kind of thing, where you need to be able build a template and then creatively design and build the door for yourself. If you’re a bit scared, start with an old or cheap kit and just see how it goes. After all, if you spend $20 on a kit and the doors fail, you haven’t lost too much.

My hinges work on a single arm which attaches to the outside of the interior tub, and the interior of the “outer” door, as you’ll see below. It’s not overly difficult to build these hinges, but getting them just right CAN be a bit fiddly. Lots of taking the door on and off the model, and it CAN get frustrating. The trick is to work slowly and carefully. When you feel the tension building up inside you, take a break and come back to it later. Just keep in the back of your mind that your car’s doors will open and close, and you should stay motivated to keep working!

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Posted by on December 16, 2012 in Cars, Tutorials

 

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